Follow Me

HEALTH & HARMONY

Loneliness is the NEW Heart Attack

"Study after study shows that people who are lonely, depressed, and isolated are three to five times more likely to die prematurely than people who feel connection in their life,” says Dr. Ornish.

Dr. Dean Ornish is an American physician and researcher. He is the president and founder of the nonprofit Preventive medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California. Dr. Ornish discovered Ornish Lifestyle Medicine, the scientifically proven program to reverse heart disease. His approach to treating heart disease through radical diet modification and exercise generated significant debate in the medical community.

In 1984 he began the Lifestyle Heart Trial, a controlled study of the effects of a low-fat diet and stress management regimen. In addition to giving up smoking and fatty foods, he included yoga, meditation and a support group.

Dr. Ornish himself suffered from isolation and depression as a young medical student and believes that the s...

The Body Trauma of Grief

By Dr. Nancy Gahles,DC, CCH, OIM

Grief is a physiological reaction to an event or events that you think should not have happened. The happening is one of loss.  Loss is usually deemed as something that wasn’t timely. “It should not have happened, not at this time, too soon, too late”, are some of the laments one might hold inside. It is the bond, the affection attributed to the person, animal, possession or state of being that has been lost that triggers grief.

The mental state, the suffering or distress we experience as a reaction to loss is a felt state.  It is felt in the body/mind. It is felt as pain in the musculoskeletal system as contractions, spasms, arthritis, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. The sensation expressed as a feeling that “I will never be the same again”, “ I am crippled”, “I am vulnerable”.

In reactions to sudden loss the visceral experience has been described as “a punch in the stomach”, as though “someone stabbed me in the back”, o...

December 2, 2016

SHARE from IP.com   

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, RSHom(NA), OIM

Feeling safe is a prerequisite to happiness, health, and wholeness, and to normal physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual development. The emotions associated with feeling safe begin in utero and follow us throughout our lives.

The element of safety allows us to take risks. Conscious choices, where we evaluate the risk and the reward, lead to stable, mature mental and emotional development and opportunities for creativity. When developed properly, sense of safety becomes an inner state of security and well-being, and allows for pursuit of relationships, bonding, and receiving or sharing attributes that create happiness.

With the rash of violence in recent times both in the United States and worldwide, an undercurrent of insecurity has fomented. The outcome of the recent presidential election elicited a similar response. People reported feeling insecure and unsafe both in their own neighborhoods and be...

April 17, 2017

    

I’ve watched athletes begin their game with the sign of the cross to bless themselves and ask for God’s protection on their game. I do that, too. I boot up the computer of my mind, body, and spirit with sound bytes, whispered prayers from all the wisdom traditions, invoking protection, abundance, and freedom. Freedom from the pain.

Then comes the cascade of thought forms—mental formations, the Buddhists call them, all the negative thoughts associated with the pain. “I can’t move”, “I won’t be able to go to work”, “How will I manage the shopping?” Let the mind games begin.

Ratcheting the feelings up a notch, the breathing changes. Stuck in the chest, panic, anxiety, shortness of breath. Catastrophizing, the psychologists call it.  “I will never be able to show my face again, everyone will know I am crippled”, “I will never get better”, “My life is over”. The sympathetic nervous system is in high gear, the feeling tone of the body is fueling the thoughts and you...

(credit: Integrative Practitioner .com Dec. 1, 2017)

Holidays harken songs of glad tidings for all: heartfelt sentiments are sent in cards, and gifts are given as tokens of affection. However, despite the seeming good cheer, multiple studies have found an increased number of heart attacks during the holiday season. 

According to one study published in the journal Circulation, during a 12 year period, there were consistently more deaths from ischemic heart disease during the winter months than the summer months.

“Ah ha!” you might say. “The cold weather is the culprit.”

Alas, no. This research group reported that about a third more deaths from ischemic heart attacks were recorded in December and January than  June through September in Los Angeles County, California. Palm trees, not pine trees, are decorated for Christmas  in the Los Angeles winter and, although colder than the summer, are still mild compared with other climates.

Robert A. Kloner, author of the editor...

The truth about autoimmune disease is that it is auto-initiated. The prevailing theory of how this occurs is that the immune system mistakenly attacks parts of the body that it is designed to protect. There are several diseases that fall into the category of autoimmune, among them are multiple sclerosis, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, type 1 diabetes, and psoriasis. Autoimmune diseases described by the National Institutes of Health “share common flaws in immune function and regulation, leading to inflammation that destroys tissue.”

The physical body is an exquisite repository of wisdom. It reacts to our mind, thoughts, fears, and pleasures with the orchestration of predictable responses designed to carry out our intentions and protect our lives. The body does not interpret the validity of a thought of harm, threat, fear. The body responds with a life protective response.

The process of inflammation is initiated often to wall off tissue from destruction. C-reactive pr...

September 5, 2017

Health & Harmony

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, OIM

Women in Pain

“There seems to be an ‘Oh she’s so neurotic’ attitude towards female chronic pain patients,” is how one woman described her experience with the healthcare system.

“I have seen many doctors...for my back pain and migraines and find that many of those doctors treat women as simple or stupid and direct questions or directions to male partners or friends,” wrote another woman.  These are responses from an online survey

conducted by National Pain Report and For Grace, a non-profit foundation.

According to their survey, over 90% of women with chronic pain feel the healthcare system discriminates against female patients.  The survey found that 84% feel they  have been treated differently by doctors because of their sex and 65% feel doctors take them less seriously because they are females.

Chronic pain conditions in women, more often than not, are multifactorial in expression.

The National Pain Report adds comments like these from...

Please reload

  • Grey Facebook Icon
  • Grey Twitter Icon
  • Grey Instagram Icon
  • Grey Pinterest Icon
Featured Posts

Middle schoolers are our future. Middle schoolers are our hope for creating a better world. Middle school comprises the 6th,7th and 8th grades where c...

Middle Schoolers at Risk for Suicidal thoughts

December 1, 2014

1/10
Please reload

Archive