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The Journal of Alternative and Complementary MedicineAhead of Print

CommentaryFree AccessOpen Access license

Published Online:11 Jun 2018https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2018.0039

Abstract

Homeopathic remedies (HRs) contain odorant molecules such as flavonoids or terpenes and can lose their efficiency in presence of some competitive odors. Such similarities, along with extreme sensitivity of the olfactory system, widespread presence of olfactory receptors over all organic tissues (where they have metabolic roles besides perception of odors), and potential direct access to the brain through olfactory nerves (ONs) and trigeminal nerves, may suggest the olfactory system as target for HRs. Recent works highlighted that HRs exist in a dual form, that is, a still molecular form at low dilution and a nanoparticulate form at high dilution, and that remnants of source remedy persist in extremely high dilutions. From the literature, both odorants and nanoparticles (NPs) can enter the body through inhala...

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, RSHom(NA), OIM (reprint from IP.com)

Type 2 diabetes is known among healthcare professionals as a disease that is amenable to diet and lifestyle changes. Reducing obesity, one of the comorbid conditions associated with Type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to reduce risk factors and the condition itself.

Diabetes represents one of the largest cost factors in our healthcare system and one of the most prevalent in our lives. Lifestyle is a word often bandied about in terms of diabetes management. Generally, it refers to exercise, diet and reducing stress.

The ubiquitous word stress rears its head in the vernacular.  It’s common usage has diluted the meaning to a generalized sense of angst or discomfort, irritation in everyday functions. The verb stressed is recounted to me by patients on a daily basis as a way in which they convey the etiology of their dis-ease. And dis-ease it is. And stressed they are, but how so?

The link between stress, that is, emotional s...

May is Mental Health Awareness Month

A reform movement in mental health in America was fomented by a former psychiatric patient whose institutionalized treatment was horrifically abusive. In 1909, Clifford W. Beers, a Yale graduate and Wall St. financier, suffered the acute trauma of grief and loss following the death of his brother. His symptoms were characteristic of a manic depressive illness which continued unabated driving him to attempt suicide. He survived only to be hospitalized in mental institutions over the next three years, experiencing horrible abuse and witnessing the cruel and inhumane treatment afforded the patients.

After his release, in 1908, Mr. Beers resolved to right the wrongs of mental health care in America and published his autobiography, A Mind That Found Itself, wherein he stated, “As I penetrated and conquered the mysteries of that dark side of my life, it no longer held any terror for me. I have decided to stand on my past and look the future in the face.” He...

(credit: Integrative Practitioner .com Dec. 1, 2017)

Holidays harken songs of glad tidings for all: heartfelt sentiments are sent in cards, and gifts are given as tokens of affection. However, despite the seeming good cheer, multiple studies have found an increased number of heart attacks during the holiday season. 

According to one study published in the journal Circulation, during a 12 year period, there were consistently more deaths from ischemic heart disease during the winter months than the summer months.

“Ah ha!” you might say. “The cold weather is the culprit.”

Alas, no. This research group reported that about a third more deaths from ischemic heart attacks were recorded in December and January than  June through September in Los Angeles County, California. Palm trees, not pine trees, are decorated for Christmas  in the Los Angeles winter and, although colder than the summer, are still mild compared with other climates.

Robert A. Kloner, author of the editor...

September 5, 2017

Health & Harmony

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, OIM

Women in Pain

“There seems to be an ‘Oh she’s so neurotic’ attitude towards female chronic pain patients,” is how one woman described her experience with the healthcare system.

“I have seen many doctors...for my back pain and migraines and find that many of those doctors treat women as simple or stupid and direct questions or directions to male partners or friends,” wrote another woman.  These are responses from an online survey

conducted by National Pain Report and For Grace, a non-profit foundation.

According to their survey, over 90% of women with chronic pain feel the healthcare system discriminates against female patients.  The survey found that 84% feel they  have been treated differently by doctors because of their sex and 65% feel doctors take them less seriously because they are females.

Chronic pain conditions in women, more often than not, are multifactorial in expression.

The National Pain Report adds comments like these from...

Published in Integrative Practitioner.com

by Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, RSHom(NA), OIM

Common sense is a basic ability to perceive, understand, and judge things that can reasonably be expected of nearly all people without need for debate. It is defined as sound practical judgment that is independent of specialized knowledge, training, or the like.

Women tend to exercise common sense in the care of their family. People who come to me as an integrative and holistic doctor want to tell me their story. They want to share the narrative of what happened to them, and they want to tell me what has caused their pain. I want to know their story. I always focus on “what makes you tick and what makes you sick?” The language their illness speaks is the one that I must interpret. It’s only common sense.

In my career, I emphasize the role of the integrative practitioner as an interpreter of the language of the body that the person is speaking. I exhort you to “inquire within” to listen for the clues as to wh...

Women in Pain

published in IntergrativePractitioner.com

“There seems to be an ‘Oh she’s so neurotic’ attitude towards female chronic pain patients,” is how one woman described her experience with the healthcare system.

“I have seen many doctors...for my back pain and migraines and find that many of those doctors treat women as simple or stupid and direct questions or directions to male partners or friends,” wrote another woman.  These are responses from an online survey

conducted by National Pain Report and For Grace, a non-profit foundation.

According to their survey, over 90% of women with chronic pain feel the healthcare system discriminates against female patients.  The survey found that 84% feel they  have been treated differently by doctors because of their sex and 65% feel doctors take them less seriously because they are females.

Chronic pain conditions in women, more often than not, are multifactorial in expression.

The National Pain Report adds comments like these from the sur...

Self Worth Award at Graduation

My office is rife this month with patients exhibiting anticipation anxieties about what college accepted them or rejected them (their hopes are dashed forever!), what classes they failed, how well they performed, and how are they positioned for success in the future?

The sea of despair, the self-accusations, the diminution of inherent self-worth hangs in the balance of the student’s final report card. It appears that the cultivation of innate self-worth through other means has not been deemed worthy in our culture. The price tag on education is a functional reality and a concomitant pathology.

The range of symptoms that accompany the self-worth crisis are as diverse as the person. There are those whose emotions are felt in the stomach who exhibit IBS, cyclic vomiting syndrome and recurrent stomach “viruses”. Tension headaches and musculoskeletal complaints are manifested in those who stiffen up in the face of the perceived stress. Performance anxiety, ailmen...

June 6, 2017

BY LIZ SEEGERT | JUNE 1, 2017

Liz Seegert (@lseegert), is AHCJ’s topic editor on aging. Her work has appeared in Kaiser Health News, The Atlantic.com, New America Media, AARP.com and other outlets. She is a senior fellow at the Center for Health, Media & Policy at Hunter College in New York City, and co-produces HealthStyles for WBAI-FM/Pacifica Radio.

View all posts by Liz Seegert →

PHOTO: FRANKIELEON VIA FLICKR

Too many physicians are prescribing opioid medications for hospitalized older adults who may not need them. A new study found that one-third of 10,000 older patients were prescribed opioid pain medications, including Percocet and OxyContin, while hospitalized for non-surgical conditions.

These patients had a longer length of stay (six days vs. four) and were more often readmitted within 30 days. They were also more likely to be restrained or have bladder catheters while hospitalized, according to the retrospective analysis.

Opioid use is particularly common in el...

Type 2 diabetes is knowingly amenable to diet and lifestyle changes. Reducing obesity, one of the comorbid conditions associated with Type 2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce risk.

Diabetes represents one of the largest costs in our healthcare system. Healthcare professionals often mention lifestyle when discussing diabetes management. Generally, this refers to exercise, diet, and reducing stress.

The ubiquitous word stress is often translated as a generalized sense of angst or discomfort—irritation in everyday functions. Patients use the word “stressed” on a daily basis to convey the etiology of their disease. A disease it is, and stressed they are, but how so?

The link between emotional stress and diabetes was recently the focus of a study conducted at Rice University. (1) The research revealed a metabolic chain reaction that begins with low inhibition—that is, lack of attention control, an executive function of the brain. The subjects who had difficulty with attent...

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