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Health & Harmony

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, OIM, MBSR

You CAN Die from a Broken Heart

February is Heart Health Month

Extreme stress can literally break your heart. Research is now clear that major life stressors cause the heart to break, suddenly, or to break down progressively over time.

Sudden heart “attacks” are caused by shocks. Witnessing shocking situations like a car accident, domestic violence, natural disasters or the death of a loved one, person or pet. Hearing of bad news qualifies for a sudden heart attack in some people when they are susceptible. For instance, the shock of a medical diagnosis, the news of loss of person, property, job or financial loss can be enough to “stun” the heart with a  cascade of hormones causing collapse of function.

Progressive “ broken” heart occurs over time as the heart muscle weakens from chronic exposure to stress. This happens most frequently in women. Heart disease is the number one killer of women. Sadly, due to lack of research on women, th...

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, RSHom(NA), OIM (reprint from IP.com)

Type 2 diabetes is known among healthcare professionals as a disease that is amenable to diet and lifestyle changes. Reducing obesity, one of the comorbid conditions associated with Type 2 diabetes, has been demonstrated to reduce risk factors and the condition itself.

Diabetes represents one of the largest cost factors in our healthcare system and one of the most prevalent in our lives. Lifestyle is a word often bandied about in terms of diabetes management. Generally, it refers to exercise, diet and reducing stress.

The ubiquitous word stress rears its head in the vernacular.  It’s common usage has diluted the meaning to a generalized sense of angst or discomfort, irritation in everyday functions. The verb stressed is recounted to me by patients on a daily basis as a way in which they convey the etiology of their dis-ease. And dis-ease it is. And stressed they are, but how so?

The link between stress, that is, emotional s...

(credit: Integrative Practitioner .com Dec. 1, 2017)

Holidays harken songs of glad tidings for all: heartfelt sentiments are sent in cards, and gifts are given as tokens of affection. However, despite the seeming good cheer, multiple studies have found an increased number of heart attacks during the holiday season. 

According to one study published in the journal Circulation, during a 12 year period, there were consistently more deaths from ischemic heart disease during the winter months than the summer months.

“Ah ha!” you might say. “The cold weather is the culprit.”

Alas, no. This research group reported that about a third more deaths from ischemic heart attacks were recorded in December and January than  June through September in Los Angeles County, California. Palm trees, not pine trees, are decorated for Christmas  in the Los Angeles winter and, although colder than the summer, are still mild compared with other climates.

Robert A. Kloner, author of the editor...

September 5, 2017

Health & Harmony

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, OIM

Women in Pain

“There seems to be an ‘Oh she’s so neurotic’ attitude towards female chronic pain patients,” is how one woman described her experience with the healthcare system.

“I have seen many doctors...for my back pain and migraines and find that many of those doctors treat women as simple or stupid and direct questions or directions to male partners or friends,” wrote another woman.  These are responses from an online survey

conducted by National Pain Report and For Grace, a non-profit foundation.

According to their survey, over 90% of women with chronic pain feel the healthcare system discriminates against female patients.  The survey found that 84% feel they  have been treated differently by doctors because of their sex and 65% feel doctors take them less seriously because they are females.

Chronic pain conditions in women, more often than not, are multifactorial in expression.

The National Pain Report adds comments like these from...

Health & Harmony

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, RSHom(NA), OIM

Summer Stress

Fake News?

Stress is prolonged tension, continued thoughts that crowd and intrude upon our lives and make us uncomfortable in body, mind and spirit. When unresolved in the moment stress accumulates. Like that pile of laundry. Or the dishes in the sink. We run out to the each to seek the solace of the sun and decide that the laundry can wait. It does wait but when you return home it is waiting there for you to deal with it.

Stress is the same scenario. Even though we are in the so called lazy, hazy days of summer, the accumulation of stressful situations in our life, be it workplace, family or social relationships continues to pile up and weigh heavily on us.  Left unattended to , the pile accumulates and becomes overwhelming. That pile appears insurmountable.

“It will never get done”, “Where do I even start?”, “It’s YOUR fault for not helping with the tasks”, “If only I had done it sooner”, “It’s too late, hopeless”.

...

Type 2 diabetes is knowingly amenable to diet and lifestyle changes. Reducing obesity, one of the comorbid conditions associated with Type 2 diabetes, has been shown to reduce risk.

Diabetes represents one of the largest costs in our healthcare system. Healthcare professionals often mention lifestyle when discussing diabetes management. Generally, this refers to exercise, diet, and reducing stress.

The ubiquitous word stress is often translated as a generalized sense of angst or discomfort—irritation in everyday functions. Patients use the word “stressed” on a daily basis to convey the etiology of their disease. A disease it is, and stressed they are, but how so?

The link between emotional stress and diabetes was recently the focus of a study conducted at Rice University. (1) The research revealed a metabolic chain reaction that begins with low inhibition—that is, lack of attention control, an executive function of the brain. The subjects who had difficulty with attent...

March 27, 2017

Adrenal Fatigue Presenting as Allergies

By Dr. Nancy Gahles, DC, CCH, OIM

Many people have suffered from allergies all their lives. Some will relate that they only recently developed allergies, perhaps after a prolonged grief or loss when the immune system takes a dip, or after a hormonal shift such as adolescence, pregnancy or menopause.

Although winter is not typically the season in which we think of an allergic presentation, the stress of holidays, the change in environmental temperature and dietary indiscretions can result in symptoms that present as allergies.  When we inquire further, the emotional state of the individual may reveal stressors that have fatigued, if not exhausted, the adrenal glands.

What are allergies?

Allergies represent a number of conditions caused by a hypersensitivity of the immune system to something in the environment that usually causes little or no problems in most people.

Conditions that we are familiar with include: hay fever, food allergies, atopic dermatit...

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